Nautilus Cajóns 

Set of Four Upright Cajons
The Finest Cajon
Andy Skellenger with a Stack of Cutsom Cajons
Andy Skellenger
Four Custom Nautilus Cajons
The Decajon, an upright Cajon with Ten Tones
Solid Padouk Contrabass Snare Cajon with Pickups
Solid Purplheart Flagship Snare Cajon
Nautilus Cajons

Cajon, Percussion, Box Drums, Flamenco Cajon, Peruvian Cajon, Custom Cajon, Cajon  Lessons, String Cajon, Snare Cajon, Cuban Cajon, Bajo Cajon, Pedal Cajon, Cajon Afroperuano, Professional Cajon, Cajon Store, Stomp Box, Cajon Set, Compact Cajon, Conga Cajon, Bongo Cajon, Djembe Cajon   

  Cajon, Percussion, Box Drums, Flamenco Cajon, Peruvian Cajon, Custom Cajon, Cajon  Lessons, String Cajon, Snare Cajon, Cuban Cajon, Bajo Cajon, Pedal Cajon, Cajon Afroperuano, Professional Cajon, Cajon Store, Stomp Box, Cajon Set, Compact Cajon, Conga Cajon, Bongo Cajon, Djembe Cajon

"The marimbula (Spanish pronunciation: [marimbula]) is a plucked box musical instrument of the Caribbean Islands (not to be confused with a marimba). It consists of a wood box with a sound hole cut in the center of it. Across this hole, a number of metal strips are attached at one end to the resonating box. These metal strips are tuned to different pitches, and are plucked to produce a bassline for the music. The mar?mbula is usually classified as part of the lamellophone family of musical instruments. It is mainly used in Mexican son jarocho music (known as marimbol), Cuban chang?? and Dominican Merengue t?pico. With its roots in African instruments, the marimbula originated in the province of Oriente, Cuba in the 19th century. Eventually it spread throughout the Caribbean the Americas and Africa, from Liberia to the Congo. By the 1930s it had made its way to Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, other Caribbean islands, Mexico, and as far away as New York City. The Cubans call it mar?mbula, and most of the other Caribbean countries have adopted this name or some variant of it: marimba, malimba, manimba, marimbol. The instrument has a number of other names, such as mar?mbola (Puerto Rico), bass box, calimba (calymba), rhumba box, Church & Clap, Jazz Jim (Jamaica), and box lamellophone.African slaves of the Caribbean made musical instruments from whatever stray material they could lay their hands on. Early marimbulas were made from discarded wooden packing crates, with tongues (keys) made of springy wood, bamboo, old hack-saw blades, all kinds of discarded springs, etc. The musician sits on top of the box reaching down to pluck the tongues whilst slapping the sides of the box like a drum. The instrument's evolution and playing style is similar to the cajon box drum." ~ Wikipedia

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